Posted on: November 10, 2009 11:28 am
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Temple-Miami(OH) Recap

Temple notched their 7th overall win which was also their 7th consecutive victory Thursday evening in front of roughly 13,000 at Lincoln Financial Field against the Red Hawks of Miami (OH). Lets take a quick look at the game from all three facets:

Offense: The team didn't have the type of rhythm which they experienced in the Toledo game. The rushing attack featuring Benard Pierce remains the bread and butter of this squad but this week Chester Stewart was chosen to be the starting quarterback. Stewart brings slightly more mobility to the offense and the abilty to improvise more as plays break down. Play calling though was extremely conservative with the insertion of Stewart into the lineup. Temple seemed content to run the ball two, three, or even four consecutive times leaving themselves in long 3rd down situations. If Chester Stewart is to start again, the play calling must be more aggressive to take advantage of teams putting 8-10 defenders in the box. Execution must also be improved when critical passing downs are required. A balanced attack is the best way to appraoch Akron, so the offense must get up and going immediately Friday evening.

Defense: What you can take away from this matchup is that our ability to stop the spread offense must be improved or we risk losing games to teams like Kent State or Ohio come the end of the season. Teams who give up 400+yds. passing to an underclassmen quarterback will not continue to exhibit a high level of success if future opponents are able to gameplan to our continual weak point. This week's matchup will test the ability of the front 7 to create pressure and fill gaps, while the secondary develops tighter coverage.

Special Teams: Seemed to be the one consistent area of the game including the immense talent in the return game. The punt and kick coverage was acceptable. The kicking game was good and continues to be good behind the freshman Brandon McManus.


Bottomline: Akron is not the most talented squad but, they did manage to score 28 points on a Kent State squad and cannot be taken for granted. With solid execution is the running and passing game Temple can have immense success on offense but the key to the matchup will be the ability of the secondary to improve their coverage.

Category: NCAAF
Tags: Temple Owls
 
Posted on: September 30, 2008 9:47 am
 

Eagles-Bears Recap

This could be a game thats haunts Philadelphia all year long. With an extremely tough division schedule on deck, and your division competition coming out of the gate quickly this was a game you truly wanted to win and didn't. Let's take a quick look at all three phases of the game and how they contributed to an Eagles 24-20 loss to the Bears.

Offense: A number of factors contributed to the inability of the Eagles to put up the offensive numbers necessary to win a hard fought game against a tough defense. First gleaming factor was the absense of Brian Westbrook due to his sprained ankle, requiring the Eagles to retool their offense to account for Correll Buckhalter. The passing game looked rather efficient considering you are still missing your first wide receiver in Kevin Curtis, but the ground game was a different story. The coaching staff was out coached in terms of a running gameplan, trying to continually run in the middle of the field right into the teeth of the Bear's front seven.

Offensively, production accounted for 20 points although the potential for many more existed. Many questions continue to surround the 4th quarter goal line stand where the Eagles coaching staff called four consecutive run plays inside the tackles, ultimately getting no points when the Bears held them on fourth down. Coupled with some early inefficiencies, the lack of balance on offense cost the Eagles any chance at consistently moving the ball throughout the game.

Will the Eagles continue to struggle with offensive balance if Brian Westbrook is sidelined again? Can Correll Buckhalter fill the gap adequately with proper play calling to provide the running game the continuity it needs to provide better passing game matchups. These questions will be answered in week 5 and will ultimately determine the direction of the Eagles season facing a tough and very physical Redskins defense.

Defense: This game against the Bears was a tale of two halves in terms of game planning and the effectiveness of the gameplan against the opposition. Again the Eagles employed a scheme based on their bread and butter, which is largely speed, blitzes, speed, and physicality. Unfortunately this speed and blitzing wasn't properly implemented during a better part of the first half as Kyle Orton had an good half putting up 21 points on 3 TD passes.

On top of the pressure created through blitzing, the Eagles front 7 was dominant against the run, holding rookie Matt Forte to a meager 43 yards on th ground. Teams who give up the fewest rushing yards in the NFL typically have success on defense and as the game waged on, this became evident. This week's matchup will test the ability of the front 7 to continually create pressure and fill gaps, while the secondary holds tight man based coverage on two wide receivers who have played for the most part above their collaborative talent level.

Special Teams: As big as special teams were in the Steelers win, they were mediocre in the Eagles loss to the Bears. While coverage on return extrordinaire Devin Hester was very good, highly touted rookie DeSean Jackson fumbled a crucial punt in the second quarter which was recovered by the Bears turning into 7 points. David Akers was...........well he was David Akers tonight and that was far from good as he again missed two field goals from 47 and 50 yards. If he hits even one of those two, the Eagles would not have had to go for a touchdown on the Bears 1 yard line.


Bottomline: AGAIN, Wins could become absolutely critical in the highly competitive NFC East, where 3 of the NFL's top 5 teams are located. With that in mind, this weeks matchup against the Redskins may be the most important contest of the year to date, matching the Eagles highly powered offense if Brian Westbrook plays, against a very physical Redskins defense. The key to the game should be the Eagle's defensive to create pressure and turnovers against a balanced Redskins offensive attack. As long as Brian Westbrook remains on the sidelines, the defense will have to continue to carry the Eagles.

Prediction: Brian Westbrook plays and the Eagles return to the confines of Lincoln Financial Field winning 30-17
Posted on: September 24, 2008 10:38 am
Edited on: September 30, 2008 12:24 pm
 

Eagles-Steelers Recap

What a game.................not too many other thoughts enter my mind as I continue to rehash parts of the Eagles-Steelers game this past weekend. Let's take a quick look at all three phases of the game and how they contributed to the final score 15-6 in favor of the Eagles.

Offense: A number of major factors entered into the inability of the Eagles to create the consistent offensive rhythm which they showed during their week 2 matchup against the Cowboys. Multiple injuries seemed to dictate how effective the offense remained throughout the course of the day, including a low ankle sprain to Brian Westbrook and a chest contusion to Donovan McNabb. McNabb was able to return to game action after only 1 series of plays, while Westbrook did not return. During the time before Westbrook was injured, McNabb was a sizzling 15-15, only to show more medicore numbers when Correll Buckhalter took over for Westbrook.

Offensively, enough production was had to score 13 offensive points, with the remaining 2 coming courtesy of the defense. These 15 points proved to be more than enough to win the game, but some lingering questions remain on offense. Can the Eagles continue to produce if Brian Westbrook is sidelined for an extended period? Can Correll Buckhalter fill the gap adequately enough to provide the running game the boost it needs to allow the aerial attack to continue. These questions should be answered as early as this weekend against a very good Bears defense.

Defense: While offense is typically the first facet of the game that most people want to talk about, this Eagles-Steelers matchup was about two words.........Eagle's Defense. After spending the week 2 matchup against the Cowboys playing more zone coverages and secondary matchups, Jim Johnson again proved to be masterful in reworking the Eagle's defensive gameplan to rectify the weak spots in the week 2 loss. The gameplan focused on one area, pressure. Ben Rothlisburger and Willie Parker were completely neutralized by the speed, blitzes, and physicality of the Eagles defense. The end result was Big Ben being sacked 8 times, knocked down another 4 times and hit a few more. These staggering statistics boiled down to a offense who could not develop any type of aerial attack because of limited throwing time Rothlisburger was allowed.

On top of the pressure created through blitzing, the Eagles front 7 was dominant against the run, holding pro bowler Willie Parker to a meager 22 yards on th ground. Teams who give up the fewest rushing yards in the NFL typically have success and win at a high percentage. This week's matchup will test the ability of the front 7 to continually create pressure and fill gaps, while the secondary holds tight man based coverage. If this formula continues to prove successful, the Bears offensive line will have their hands full protecting a young, highly immobile quarterback in Kyle Orton.

Special Teams: Unusual to say this, but the MVP of the Eagles-Steelers matchup was none other than punter Sav Rocca. Rocca was able to pin the Steelers inside their own 20 on more than 3 critical occasions including one 64 yd. punt going out inside the red zone. Seems that this Austrailian rules football star is really coming into his own in the NFL. David Akers was...........well he was David Akers.


Bottomline: Wins could become absolutely critical in the highly competitive NFC East, where 3 of the NFL's top 5 teams are located. With that in mind, this weeks matchup against the Bears is another important contest matching the Eagles highly powered offense against a very good Bears defense. The key to the game should be the Eagle's defensive to create pressure and turnovers against a very mediocre Bears offense. As long as Brian Westbrook remains on the sidelines, the defense will have to carry the Eagles.

Prediction: Even without Brian Westbrook, Eagles prove too much winning 27-10
Posted on: September 12, 2008 3:12 pm
Edited on: September 30, 2008 12:24 pm
 

Thoughts from Temple_-UConn

I question once again how much can be taken from the Temple-UConn game in Philadelphia but here is my best impression of how the game broke down.

Offense: The team didn't have the type of flow which they experienced in the Army game. The hurry-up offense which was used in Week 1 was almost completely abandoned partially due to the weather. That aside, running the ball with the tailbacks and not the QB will be necessary to keep defenses honest. Execution must also be improved, example we'll use is the 40yd. pass to Travis Shelton near the end of quarter 3 may have been enough to seal the game had it not been dropped. The weather was not perfect, but the drops turned into interceptions must be corrected.

A balanced attack is the best way to attack Buffalo, so the offense must get up and going immediately Saturday.

Defense: Again, tough to gauge progress when you play in such awful conditions, but what you can take away is that our ability to stop the run must be improved or we risk losing plenty of games. Teams who give up 214yds. rushing to a single tailback don't win at a high percentage. This week's matchup will test the ability of the front 7 to create pressure and fill gaps, while the secondary holds tight coverage.

Special Teams: Seemed to be the one consistent area of the game considering the weather conditions. The punt and kick coverage was acceptable and the return efforts were okay but the lack of fair catch calls in the weather bothered me. The kicking game was great, considering we were in the middle of a tropical storm.


Bottomline: UConn is a much better team than Army was, yet Temple played competitively but also showed some weaknesses that Buffalo will surely try to exploit. Temple is more than capable of winning in week 3, provided they manage to slow down a rushing attack that could be potent.
Category: NCAAF
Tags: Temple Owls
 
Posted on: September 2, 2008 3:54 pm
Edited on: September 30, 2008 12:24 pm
 

Thoughts from West Point, NY

I question how much can be taken from the Temple-Army game in West Point but here is my best impression of how the game broke down.

Offense: The team didn't log enough possession time to truly build the type of momentum needed to evaluate what type of deficiencies existed. The hurry-up offense was effective though, and I believe you will see it a number of times this year. It would have been nice to get the freshman RB's more touches.

Defense: Again, tough to gauge progress when you play against such a vanilla offensive gameplan such as Army's but what you can take away is that our speed with the front 7 and the secondary should be a huge asset. This week's matchup will test the ability of the front 7 to create pressure and secondary to hold coverage for an extended period.

Special Teams: Seemed to be the one shining area of the game. The punt and kick coverage was very good and with a TD return on a kickoff as well as a breakaway punt return the prospects of much improved special teams seems likely. The kicking game was yet untested, but we'll have to see how things progress on this front.


Bottomline: Army is a BAD team, so Temple must be prepared for a matchup this week with a much better program. With consistent defensive play and some good decisions on offense, Temple is more than capable of winning in week 2.
Category: NCAAF
Tags: Temple Owls
 
 
 
 
 
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